Symptom Articles

Just what is a symptom? A symptom is defined as a physical sign or physical sensation that is evidence a disease is present.
Symptoms can guide your veterinarian toward a diagnosis or help your veterinarian decide which tests would be most helpful in your pet. Once a disease is diagnosed, proper treatment can be administered. Learn more about the most common symptoms.

Dog Symptoms

Abscess

Overview

An abscess is defined as a sac or lump that contains pus. Abscesses are generally caused by bacteria, parasites, or foreign material under the skin. Trauma to the skin or to the underlying tissues may predispose to infection and abscess formation.

Some abscesses heal without treatment if the white blood cells are able to destroy the invading cells. In this case, the active source of continued infection will be eliminated and the body will slowly absorb the pus that was created during the battle to destroy the invading material.

Frequently, though, abscesses do not heal without treatment and veterinary care is recommended.

Most commonly, abscesses are related to a recent fight or other penetrating puncture wound.

Diagnosis and Treatment Notes:

The diagnosis of an abscess is typically accomplished through history, physical examination findings, and aspiration of a mass looking for pus.

Treatment depends on the cause and location of the abscess, your individual pet, and your veterinarian. Treatment may include lancing and draining the abscess, antibiotics and cleaning the wound with disinfectant. Discuss treatment details when your pet is diagnosed with this condition.

What to Watch for*:

Redness, swelling, pain and/or discharge from wound
Missing hair
Poor Appetite
Lethargy

* Please notify us if you notice any of the above signs or if you have any questions!

Alopecia

Overview

Alopecia is the complete or partial lack of hair in any area of the skin where hair would normally be found. It may be caused by self-trauma by scratching or chewing, hair follicle diseases that cause the hair to fall out, or the failure of hair to grow after normal loss. Hormonal abnormalities and other metabolic abnormalities may also cause hair loss.

Severe hair loss makes your dog more susceptible to the elements. In addition, some of the diseases that can cause alopecia may also have harmful effects on other organ systems of your dog.

Diagnosis and Treatment Notes:

The underlying cause of alopecia is generally diagnosed by microscopic examination of the hair, skin scrapings, fungal cultures and possibly a biopsy of the skin. General blood work as well as thyroid and cortisol levels may be recommended to evaluate general health and for the differential diagnosis of hormonal or metabolic causes of hair loss.

Treatment depends on the severity of the disease, your individual pet, and your veterinarian. There is no specific treatment for alopecia. Instead, treatment is aimed at eliminating the underlying cause of the problem. Discuss treatment details when your pet is diagnosed with this condition.

What to Watch for*:

Hair loss
Abnormal appearance of the skin

*Please notify us if you notice any of the above signs or if you have any questions!

Cervical (Neck) Pain

Overview

Cervical disc disease involves the acute or chronic pressure of material from an intervertebral disc pressing on or around the spinal cord in the area of the neck.

The exact cause of disc degeneration is unknown but in many cases there is a change in the content of the disc from a soft, pliable gel to stiff mineral that can slowly compress the spinal cord or suddenly burst into the spinal canal. Discs in the cervical region of the spine can affect the front legs and the back legs to varying degrees. This disc disease can affect one side of the body or both sides.

Dogs may show only mild neck pain all the way through to complete paralysis of all four legs without the ability to perceive any sensation whatsoever. Sudden onset neck pain is the most common clinical sign.

Chondrodystrophic breeds such as dachshunds and Pekingese are among the breeds more commonly affected. There is a higher incidence in beagles. Most dogs are middle aged and there is no sex predilection.

Diagnosis and Treatment Notes:

Cervical pain is generally diagnosed by history, physical examination findings including a neurologic and orthopedic exam and x-rays of the neck.

Treatment depends on the underlying cause of the neck pain, severity of the disease, your individual pet, and your veterinarian. Treatment may consist of anti-inflammatory medication and muscle relaxants. In severe cases, surgery may be recommended. Discuss treatment details when your pet is diagnosed with this condition.

What to Watch for*:

Sudden onset of neck pain
Clumsiness or “walking drunk”
Holding one front leg up when sitting
Inability to walk

*Please notify us if you notice any of the above signs or if you have any questions!

Ear Discharge

Overview

Ear problems are one of the most common ailments afflicting dogs and cats and may be due to infection, trauma, parasites or other diseases. Most often, the first sign is the presence of discharge from the ear.

Sometimes, mild discharge is normal. Some pets tend to produce more wax than others. For other pets, ear discharge is often a sign of trouble.

Pets with ear problems usually start scratching when the trouble begins. The trauma of scratching causes swelling and discharge within the ear canal. The ears may then develop a secondary infection with either bacteria or yeast. Diseases that suppress the immune system and immune skin diseases can also lead to ear problems. Dogs with floppy, hairy ears and dogs that swim may be predisposed to developing ear infections and ear discharge.

Diagnosis and Treatment Notes:

Ear discharge is typically diagnosed through history and physical examination. The cause of the discharge requires further testing such as cytology (examining the discharge under a microscope), bacterial or fungal culture, bloodwork, or allergy testing.

Treatment depends on the underlying cause of the discharge, your individual pet, and your veterinarian. Treatment may include thorough ear cleaning, ear medication, oral medication such as antibiotics and/or steroids, allergy medication or even surgery. Discuss treatment details when your pet is diagnosed with this condition.

What to Watch for*:

Ear scratching
Head shaking
Redness, swelling, discharge and odor from the ears

* Please notify us if you notice any of the above signs or if you have any questions!

Eye Discharge

Overview

Eye discharge is a common sign of eye disease. Abnormal discharge may develop suddenly or gradually. The discharge may be watery, mucoid (gray, ropy), mucopurulent (yellow-green, thickened) or bloody. In general, the more discharge present, the more serious the disease.

It is common for eye discharge to be associated with other symptoms such as pain, squinting, redness or rubbing at the eye.

There are numerous causes of eye discharge including a blocked tear duct, conjunctivitis, eyelid abnormalities, corneal ulcers, glaucoma, inflammation within the eye, trauma or dry eye.

Diagnosis and Treatment Notes:

Eye discharge is typically diagnosed through history and complete eye examination. The cause of the discharge generally requires further testing such as Schirmer tear test, fluorescein corneal staining, and measuring eye pressure. Additional tests such as cytology (examining cells under a microscope), bacterial or fungal culture, bloodwork, head x-rays or even CT or MRI may also be recommended.

Treatment depends on the underlying cause of the discharge, your individual pet, and your veterinarian. Treatment may include topical eye medication, oral medication such as antibiotics and/or steroids or even surgery. Discuss treatment details when your pet is evaluated and the underlying condition causing the eye discharge is diagnosed.

What to Watch for*:

Rubbing or scratching at eyes
Eye redness
Squinting
Light sensitivity
Swelling around the eyes
Continued eye discharge

* Please notify us if you notice any of the above signs or if you have any questions!

Gastroenteritis

Overview

Acute vomiting and diarrhea are characterized by a sudden onset and short duration of less than two to three weeks. Acute vomiting and diarrhea are both extremely common in animals.

An occasional bout of vomiting and diarrhea may be typical in some dogs or cats however, severe, acute vomiting and diarrhea is not normal, and can be associated with life threatening illnesses. It can cause extreme fluid loss, acid-base imbalance, and electrolyte disturbance. There are many causes of gastroenteritis including dietary indiscretion, dietary intolerance, bacterial or viral infections, gastrointestinal parasite, drugs, toxins, obstruction, inflammatory bowel disease, various metabolic disorders, etc.

Diagnosis and Treatment Notes:

Gastroenteritis is typically diagnosed through history and physical examination findings. Determining the cause of the gastroenteritis requires further testing such as bloodwork, abdominal x-rays, abdominal ultrasound and fecal examinations.

Treatment depends on the underlying disorder, severity of the disease, your individual pet, and your veterinarian. Treatment may include fluids, drugs to coat and soothe the gastrointestinal tract, drugs to stop vomiting, antibiotics, other drugs to treat the underlying disease. Initially, pets are not offered any food or water until the vomiting stops. Eventually the animal is temporarily fed a bland diet. Discuss treatment details when your pet is diagnosed with this condition.

What to Watch for*:

Vomiting and/or diarrhea for several days
Dehydration
Depression
Listlessness
Presence of blood in the stool or vomit

* Please notify us if you notice any of the above signs or if you have any questions!

Halitosis

Overview

Halitosis, or bad breath, is an unpleasant odor coming from your pet’s mouth. Usually halitosis has oral causes, although sometimes it can be caused by other disease processes. Causes include gingivitis (inflammation of the gums), periodontitis (inflammation of the tissue that surrounds the tooth), mouth ulcers, foreign objects, cancer of the mouth or severe kidney disease.

Diagnosis and Treatment Notes:


Halitosis is generally diagnosed by a thorough oral examination. To fully evaluate the teeth, dental x-rays are recommended. Bloodwork may also be recommended to look for underlying disease.

Treatment depends on the severity of the disease, your individual pet, and your veterinarian. Pets with halitosis benefit from a thorough teeth cleaning and polishing. Sometimes diseased teeth need to be extracted. After cleaning, periodic flushing of the mouth with antiseptic can also help. Discuss treatment details when your pet is diagnosed with this condition.

What to Watch for*:

Bad breath
Oral discharge
Oral pain
Bloody oral discharge
Drooling
Dysphagia (difficulty swallowing)
Difficulty chewing

*Please notify us if you notice any of the above signs or if you have any questions!

Hematuria

Overview

Hematuria is the presence of red blood cells in the urine. It may be visible to the naked eye or microscopic. Possible causes of hematuria include bacterial infections of the urinary tract, bladder or kidney stones, bleeding disorders, trauma, normal heat cycles in female dogs, medication related or even some cancers.

Diagnosis and Treatment Notes:

The presence of hematuria is typically diagnosed through history, physical examination findings and urinalysis. The underlying cause of the hematuria requires further testing such as urine culture and bloodwork. In some cases, additional tests such as clotting tests, x-rays and ultrasound may be recommended.

Treatment depends on the cause of the hematuria, your individual pet, and your veterinarian. Treatment may include antibiotics, dietary change, fluid therapy, surgery, and in cases of rat poison, vitamin K. Discuss treatment details when your pet is evaluated and the underlying condition causing the hematuria is diagnosed.

What to Watch for*:

Blood in urine
Painful or difficult urination
Straining to urinate
Frequent passage of small amounts of urine
Abdominal pain

*Please notify us if you notice any of the above signs or if you have any questions!

Megaesopahus

Overview

Megaesophagus is a condition of decreased or absent movement of the esophagus. The esophagus is the tube that carries food and water from the throat to the stomach. With megaesophagus, passing food all the way to the stomach becomes difficult, and the food may be regurgitated back up into the throat. This reduced motility usually results in dilation of the esophagus. In some animals, pneumonia secondary to regurgitation may occur when food is aspirated into the lungs.

Megaesophagus is seen in both dogs and cats; however, it is much more common in dogs. It is hereditary in the wirehaired fox terrier and miniature schnauzer. Other breeds commonly affected include the German shepherd dog, Newfoundland, Great Dane, Irish setter, Chinese shar-pei, pug, and greyhound.

Diagnosis and Treatment Notes:

Megaesophagus is generally diagnosed by physical examination, bloodwork and chest x-rays. Specialized tests such as acetylcholine receptor antibody titer may be recommended.

Treatment depends on the underlying disease, severity, your individual pet, and your veterinarian. In addition to treatment for any underlying cause, drugs to help gastrointestinal motility can help. Pets with secondary pneumonia are treated with antibiotics and fluid therapy. Discuss treatment details when your pet is diagnosed with this condition.

What to Watch for*:

Regurgitation of food and water
Fever
Cough
Nasal discharge
Salivation
Difficulty swallowing
Weight loss
Poor body condition

*Please notify us if you notice any of the above signs or if you have any questions!

Obesity

Overview

Obesity is defined as the excessive accumulation of body fat. Between 25 and 40 percent of pets are considered obese or are likely to become obese. It is the most common nutrition-related health condition in our society.

The primary causes of obesity are overeating and lack of exercise. When regular caloric intake exceeds the energy burned, the excess is stored as fat. As little as an extra 1 percent caloric intake can result in a 25 percent increase over ideal body weight by middle age.

Diagnosis and Treatment Notes:

Obesity is generally diagnosed by physical examination findings and a review of your pet’s weight and body condition score. To determine if there is an underlying disorder, bloodwork may be recommended including a thyroid level.

Treatment depends on your pet’s initial weight, body condition score, underlying disease, your individual pet, and your veterinarian. Daily caloric intake is lowered by changing the type or amount of food. Exercise should be slowly increased. Discuss treatment details when your pet is diagnosed with this condition.

What to Watch for*:

Large body size
Difficulty breathing
Difficulty walking
Exercise intolerance
Heat intolerance

*Please notify us if you notice any of the above signs or if you have any questions!

Cat Symptoms

Alopecia

Overview

Alopecia is the complete or partial lack of hair in any area of the skin where hair would normally be found. It may be caused by self-trauma by scratching or chewing, hair follicle diseases that cause the hair to fall out, or the failure of hair to grow after normal loss. Hormonal abnormalities and other metabolic abnormalities may also cause hair loss.

Severe hair loss makes your dog more susceptible to the elements. In addition, some of the diseases that can cause alopecia may also have harmful effects on other organ systems of your dog.

Diagnosis and Treatment Notes:

The underlying cause of alopecia is generally diagnosed by microscopic examination of the hair, skin scrapings, fungal cultures and possibly a biopsy of the skin. General blood work as well as thyroid and cortisol levels may be recommended to evaluate general health and for the differential diagnosis of hormonal or metabolic causes of hair loss.

Treatment depends on the severity of the disease, your individual pet, and your veterinarian. There is no specific treatment for alopecia. Instead, treatment is aimed at eliminating the underlying cause of the problem. Discuss treatment details when your pet is diagnosed with this condition.

What to Watch for*:

Hair loss
Abnormal appearance of the skin

*Please notify us if you notice any of the above signs or if you have any questions!

Constipation In Cats

Overview

Constipation is infrequent, incomplete, or difficult defecation with passage of hard or dry feces. Constipation is sometimes used interchangeably with obstipation, which is intractable constipation where defecation becomes impossible. It may cause great distress and pain.

Constipation can occur in association with any disorder that impairs the passage of fecal material through the colon, slowing its transit time. This delay in transit allows the removal of additional salt and water from the feces, producing harder and drier stools.

Systemic signs of constipation vary. Feces can be retained for days before any deleterious effects are observed. Some animals may display mild signs, such as a slightly prolonged posture while defecating, and then produce a dry, firm stool. Others will have frequent or painful attempts to defecate with little or no fecal passage.

Diagnosis and Treatment Notes:

Constipation is generally diagnosed by a thorough history, physical examination and abdominal x-rays. Bloodwork and abdominal ultrasound may be recommended.

Treatment depends on the severity of the disease, your individual pet, and your veterinarian. Cats with constipation are treated with enemas, fluids, stool softeners, and an increase in fiber in the diet. In a small number of cases, surgical removal of part of the colon may be necessary. Discuss treatment details when your pet is diagnosed with this condition.

What to Watch for*:

Straining to defecate
Dry, hard feces
Infrequent defecation
Vomiting
Poor appetite
Lethargy

* Please notify us if you notice any of the above signs or if you have any questions!

Ear Discharge

Overview

Ear problems are one of the most common ailments afflicting dogs and cats and may be due to infection, trauma, parasites or other diseases. Most often, the first sign is the presence of discharge from the ear.

Sometimes, mild discharge is normal. Some pets tend to produce more wax than others. For other pets, ear discharge is often a sign of trouble.

Pets with ear problems usually start scratching when the trouble begins. The trauma of scratching causes swelling and discharge within the ear canal. The ears may then develop a secondary infection with either bacteria or yeast. Diseases that suppress the immune system and immune skin diseases can also lead to ear problems. Dogs with floppy, hairy ears and dogs that swim may be predisposed to developing ear infections and ear discharge.

Diagnosis and Treatment Notes:

Ear discharge is typically diagnosed through history and physical examination. The cause of the discharge requires further testing such as cytology (examining the discharge under a microscope), bacterial or fungal culture, bloodwork, or allergy testing.

Treatment depends on the underlying cause of the discharge, your individual pet, and your veterinarian. Treatment may include thorough ear cleaning, ear medication, oral medication such as antibiotics and/or steroids, allergy medication or even surgery. Discuss treatment details when your pet is diagnosed with this condition.

What to Watch for*:

Ear scratching
Head shaking
Redness, swelling, discharge and odor from the ears

* Please notify us if you notice any of the above signs or if you have any questions!

Eye Discharge

Overview

Eye discharge is a common sign of eye disease. Abnormal discharge may develop suddenly or gradually. The discharge may be watery, mucoid (gray, ropy), mucopurulent (yellow-green, thickened) or bloody. In general, the more discharge present, the more serious the disease.

It is common for eye discharge to be associated with other symptoms such as pain, squinting, redness or rubbing at the eye.

There are numerous causes of eye discharge including a blocked tear duct, conjunctivitis, eyelid abnormalities, corneal ulcers, glaucoma, inflammation within the eye, trauma or dry eye.

Diagnosis and Treatment Notes:

Eye discharge is typically diagnosed through history and complete eye examination. The cause of the discharge generally requires further testing such as Schirmer tear test, fluorescein corneal staining, and measuring eye pressure. Additional tests such as cytology (examining cells under a microscope), bacterial or fungal culture, bloodwork, head x-rays or even CT or MRI may also be recommended.

Treatment depends on the underlying cause of the discharge, your individual pet, and your veterinarian. Treatment may include topical eye medication, oral medication such as antibiotics and/or steroids or even surgery. Discuss treatment details when your pet is evaluated and the underlying condition causing the eye discharge is diagnosed.

What to Watch for*:

Rubbing or scratching at eyes
Eye redness
Squinting
Light sensitivity
Swelling around the eyes
Continued eye discharge

* Please notify us if you notice any of the above signs or if you have any questions!

Gastroenteritis

Overview

Acute vomiting and diarrhea are characterized by a sudden onset and short duration of less than two to three weeks. Acute vomiting and diarrhea are both extremely common in animals.

An occasional bout of vomiting and diarrhea may be typical in some dogs or cats however, severe, acute vomiting and diarrhea is not normal, and can be associated with life threatening illnesses. It can cause extreme fluid loss, acid-base imbalance, and electrolyte disturbance. There are many causes of gastroenteritis including dietary indiscretion, dietary intolerance, bacterial or viral infections, gastrointestinal parasite, drugs, toxins, obstruction, inflammatory bowel disease, various metabolic disorders, etc.

Diagnosis and Treatment Notes:

Gastroenteritis is typically diagnosed through history and physical examination findings. Determining the cause of the gastroenteritis requires further testing such as bloodwork, abdominal x-rays, abdominal ultrasound and fecal examinations.

Treatment depends on the underlying disorder, severity of the disease, your individual pet, and your veterinarian. Treatment may include fluids, drugs to coat and soothe the gastrointestinal tract, drugs to stop vomiting, antibiotics, other drugs to treat the underlying disease. Initially, pets are not offered any food or water until the vomiting stops. Eventually the animal is temporarily fed a bland diet. Discuss treatment details when your pet is diagnosed with this condition.

What to Watch for*:

Vomiting and/or diarrhea for several days
Dehydration
Depression
Listlessness
Presence of blood in the stool or vomit

* Please notify us if you notice any of the above signs or if you have any questions!

Halitosis

Overview

Halitosis, or bad breath, is an unpleasant odor coming from your pet’s mouth. Usually halitosis has oral causes, although sometimes it can be caused by other disease processes. Causes include gingivitis (inflammation of the gums), periodontitis (inflammation of the tissue that surrounds the tooth), mouth ulcers, foreign objects, cancer of the mouth or severe kidney disease.

Diagnosis and Treatment Notes:


Halitosis is generally diagnosed by a thorough oral examination. To fully evaluate the teeth, dental x-rays are recommended. Bloodwork may also be recommended to look for underlying disease.

Treatment depends on the severity of the disease, your individual pet, and your veterinarian. Pets with halitosis benefit from a thorough teeth cleaning and polishing. Sometimes diseased teeth need to be extracted. After cleaning, periodic flushing of the mouth with antiseptic can also help. Discuss treatment details when your pet is diagnosed with this condition.

What to Watch for*:

Bad breath
Oral discharge
Oral pain
Bloody oral discharge
Drooling
Dysphagia (difficulty swallowing)
Difficulty chewing

*Please notify us if you notice any of the above signs or if you have any questions!

Megacolon

Overview

Megacolon is a condition of extreme dilation and poor motility of the colon, usually combined with accumulation of fecal material and the inability to evacuate it. The majority of cases (62 percent) are “primary” or “idiopathic,” which means there is no obvious reason for the condition. Some cases are “secondary,” meaning that something has interfered with normal defecation for a prolonged period of time, causing chronic constipation, with megacolon occurring as a sequela. Recent studies have shown that cats with idiopathic megacolon have a defect in the ability of the muscle in the colon to contract.

Megacolon can occur in any age, breed, or sex of cat, however, most cases are seen in middle aged cats (average age is 5.8 years). Most cases are in males (70 percent males, 30 percent females). Megacolon can be a frustrating and difficult condition.

Diagnosis and Treatment Notes:

Megacolon is generally diagnosed by history, physical examination and abdominal x-rays. Bloodwork, ultrasound and colonoscopy may be recommended.

Treatment depends on the severity of the disease, your individual pet, and your veterinarian. The majority of cats with megacolon are treated with high fiber diets, laxatives and enemas. In some cases, drugs that increase colon contractions or surgery may be necessary. Discuss treatment details when your pet is diagnosed with this condition.

What to Watch for*:

Decreased or absent defecation
Painful defecation
Multiple, unproductive efforts to defecate
Dry, hard feces

*Please notify us if you notice any of the above signs or if you have any questions!

Obesity

Overview

Obesity is defined as the excessive accumulation of body fat. Between 25 and 40 percent of pets are considered obese or are likely to become obese. It is the most common nutrition-related health condition in our society.

The primary causes of obesity are overeating and lack of exercise. When regular caloric intake exceeds the energy burned, the excess is stored as fat. As little as an extra 1 percent caloric intake can result in a 25 percent increase over ideal body weight by middle age.

Diagnosis and Treatment Notes:

Obesity is generally diagnosed by physical examination findings and a review of your pet’s weight and body condition score. To determine if there is an underlying disorder, bloodwork may be recommended including a thyroid level.

Treatment depends on your pet’s initial weight, body condition score, underlying disease, your individual pet, and your veterinarian. Daily caloric intake is lowered by changing the type or amount of food. Exercise should be slowly increased. Discuss treatment details when your pet is diagnosed with this condition.

What to Watch for*:

Large body size
Difficulty breathing
Difficulty walking
Exercise intolerance
Heat intolerance

*Please notify us if you notice any of the above signs or if you have any questions!

Otitis Externa

Overview

Otitis externa, commonly called an ear infection, is characterized by inflammation of the external ear canal and may be caused by yeast, bacteria or parasites.

Ear infections of all kinds can also occur in cats, however those caused by ear mites are most common.

Diagnosis and Treatment Notes:

Otitis externa is generally diagnosed by thorough physical examination, including an ear exam and microscopic examination of the discharge from the ear, and culture of the ear discharge to determine the underlying cause and the best antibiotic.

Treatment depends on the severity of the disease, your individual pet, and your veterinarian. The majority of animals with an ear infection are treated with topical ear medication. Some are also treated with oral antibiotics and possibly steroids. Discuss treatment details when your pet is diagnosed with this condition.

What to Watch for*:

Scratching or rubbing the ears
Head shaking or head tilt
Abnormal odor or discharge from the ear
Pain when the ear is manipulated

*Please notify us if you notice any of the above signs or if you have any questions!

Polyuria and Polydipsia

Overview

The term polydipsia refers to excessive thirst manifested by excessive water intake, which in turn usually leads to polyuria, which is the formation and excretion of a large volume of urine. Polydipsia and polyuria are early signs of several diseases including kidney failure or infection, diabetes, pyometra (uterine infection), liver disease, high blood calcium and others.

Dogs and cats normally take in about 20 to 40 milliliters per pound of body weight per day, or 3 cups per day for a 20 pound dog or 2.5 cups per day for a 10 pound cat. This includes any water they take in with their food, such as in canned food. Anything more than that, under normal environmental conditions, is considered polydipsia.

Diagnosis and Treatment Notes:

Polyuria and polydipsia is typically diagnosed through history and physical examination. Increased water consumption can be done by measuring the exact amount of water that is consumed per day. Determining the cause of the increased thirst and urination requires further testing such as bloodwork, urinalysis, x-rays, specialized blood tests or even CT or MRI.

Treatment depends on the underlying cause, your individual pet, and your veterinarian. Treatment may include intravenous fluid therapy, insulin, or even surgery. Discuss treatment details when your pet is diagnosed with this condition.

What to Watch for*:

Drinking large amounts of water
Frequent urinations
Change in appetite
Change in behavior
Lethargy
Vomiting/diarrhea
Weakness

* Please notify us if you notice any of the above signs or if you have any questions!